Wednesday, December 10, 2014

How LB Airport, Police and Transit Combined to Bring Servicemen Home

Saturday afternoon, after a multi-leg return trip from Afghanistan, 87 servicemen and women landed at Long Beach Airport (LGB) to find that the charter bus scheduled to pick them up had not arrived. What’s more, a miscommunication meant that the company would only be able to send one bus, all the way from Ontario. That wouldn't work.
Boarding LB Transit after landing at AirFlite, located at LGB

Instead of waiting, they contacted the Long Beach Police Department to ask for assistance. Both the police watch commander and the airport watch commander on duty immediately reached out to Long Beach Transit (LBT) with the request.

Within minutes, three LBT buses had arrived, complete with an Airport Security escort, to pick up the troops and bring them to their waiting friends and family in the city of Bell. LBPD presented the Army sergeant with a challenge coin for his service.

LGB was proud to play a role in this citywide effort, and is honored to again work with the men and women of our military.





Tuesday, December 9, 2014

IAF Receives Final C-17 from Boeing

Over the past two decades, no aircraft has served as a mascot to the Long Beach community like the Boeing C-17 Globemaster III. Today, the tenth C-17 ordered by the nation of India departed Long Beach Airport to head to its new home.

Production of various C-17 models will continue until mid-2015, but the India-bound aircraft is the last C-17 on customer order. Boeing has delivered 263 of these planes around the world over the past 21 years – each one designed and manufactured here on Long Beach Airport premises.

When deliveries first began in 1993, the C-17 offered new capabilities for a heavy lift aircraft, especially in disaster situations. Its unique design allows it to carry hundreds of passengers, or objects as heavy as a military tank, and it can also take off and land on shorter runways than other aircraft of similar size.

Foreign nations like Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom and even NATO all use the C-17 today. The U.S. Air Force alone has taken delivery of 223 examples of the C-17 Globemaster III for combat and humanitarian missions.

In person, the C-17 is so large and imposing that its versatility seems remarkable, which only adds to its legend. The enormous grey tails, peeking out over walls lining the Boeing perimeter, have been an unmistakable trademark of the Long Beach Airport for more than twenty years. Use the hashtag #C17Legend to share your photos and thoughts on social media.





Monday, December 8, 2014

Super Guppy Scheduled to Visit Long Beach Airport

The famed B-377-SGT “Super Guppy Turbine,” operated by NASA, will fly into Long Beach Airport (LGB) on Monday, December 8 from its home base in El Paso, Texas. One of five Super Guppies ever made, this massive aircraft is the only one still in use today. The arrival is even bringing out the Discovery Channel to shoot footage of the Super Guppy for an upcoming TV episode.
The special guest is a welcome arrival at Long Beach Airport, and any plane-spotters present for the arrival are encouraged to use the hashtag #SuperGuppyLGB on Twitter, Instagram and other social media platforms.
Super Guppy Turbine, pictured in Hunstville, AL; Marshall Space Flight Center 

















When it lands at Long Beach Airport, the Super Guppy will make its triumphant return as one of the largest planes to ever use our runways. In fact, a Super Guppy hasn’t landed at Long Beach since one came here to deliver parts for the Apollo moon missions. Codenamed N941NA, this Super Guppy will stay at LGB for only one day before heading off on Tuesday, December 9.
The enormous Super Guppy is famous for its massive cargo area with a diameter of 25 feet, an overall cargo volume of 49,750 cubic feet and a whopping total height of 48 ft. and 6 inches – over ten feet taller than the Boeing 377 on which the Super Guppy is based.
That height has led some to describe the Super Guppy as having an “E.T. head.” Even stranger, the nose opens on hinges that can swing at angles as wide as 110 degrees. In the past, this unique feature has been utilized to transport smaller aircraft, or components eventually destined for the International Space Station.
The combination of the turbine engine, mated to an old-school propeller, will create a strong but smooth rumble as the Super Guppy cruises through Long Beach airspace.