Thursday, January 12, 2017

Improved Roadways and Walkways Arrive at LGB

Right before the winter holidays began, over a month of construction and maintenance in front of the historic terminal at Long Beach Airport (LGB) came to an end.

One crosswalk was removed to enhance pedestrian safety.
Directly in front of the terminal, a lane was added to improve the flow of traffic; there are now three lanes total, allowing one for loading and two for vehicles to pass through. The center median was enhanced with the addition of a safety railing and now provides more room for travelers being picked up and dropped off. Safety was also improved with a raised, widened crosswalk that will help reduce the speed of vehicles in front of the historic terminal building.


Safety railing was added to the widened median.
This month, construction is set to begin on Lot A, the parking structure nearest to the historic terminal, to enhance safety and accessibility for travelers who park at LGB. The garage's enclosed staircases will be replaced with outdoor stairways, the existing elevator will be updated and replaced with two elevators, vehicle entry and exit points will be modified, lighting and interior painting will be improved, and parking spaces will be restriped. Renovations are set to be complete by Fall 2017.

Thursday, January 5, 2017

Water Treatment Facility to be Constructed near Long Beach Airport

Hard hats and shovels at the groundbreaking ceremony
On Monday, December 12, 2016, representatives from Long Beach Airport, the City of Long Beach, the City of Signal Hill, and CalTrans gathered for a groundbreaking ceremony for a storm water capture and treatment facility located southeast of the Airport.

Airport Director Romo and other Airport representatives
The Los Cerritos Channel Sub-Basin 4 Storm Water Capture project is one of multiple construction projects occurring around the Airport. The project is also one of six projects around the airport focused on water capture and treatment. Upon completion, the facility will be able to collect 120 acre-feet of storm and rain water. The water capture and treatment facility will trap zinc and copper fragments from storm water to prevent them from entering the Los Cerritos Channel. Subsidized by an $11 million grant from CalTrans, the total cost of the project is $50 million.

Representatives from the City of Signal Hill pose in their hard hats.
The facility will be located away from public view and construction should not impact Airport operations. The contractor must abide by a vertical clearance so that equipment and stockpiles do not block flight paths; construction that requires tall equipment must be completed after the Airport’s main runway (30/12) closes in the evening. The project is expected to be completed by December 2017.

Thursday, November 17, 2016

Long Beach Airport’s Festival of Flight Proves Itself a Sky High Success

On Saturday, November 5, nearly 5,000 people attended Long Beach Airport’s (LGB) fourth annual Festival of Flight on the west side of the airfield. Despite early morning fog, this year’s event proved to be bigger and better than before due to the efforts of Airport personnel and Councilwoman Stacy Mungo of the 5th District.

Councilwoman Mungo, Airport Director Romo, and Commander Chuck Street take the stage.
Formerly known as the Fly-In, the biggest event of its kind in the Long Beach area brought together families and people of all ages. The Festival’s Veteran’s Day theme was made evident during the opening ceremonies; members of the military presented the colors, the National Anthem was performed, and speakers including Councilwoman Stacy Mungo, Airport Director Jess L. Romo, and Commander Chuck Street led the Pledge of Allegiance.

Crowds surround the Orbis DC-10.
Static aircraft displays included WWII-era warbirds, a Gulfstream Jet, a Citation Mustang, and a Catalina Flying Boat DC-3. With a line spanning nearly half of the event space, the most popular aircraft at the event proved to be the Orbis DC-10. This aircraft was the second DC-10 produced by McDonnell Douglas in Long Beach and was later converted into an ophthalmic hospital and teaching facility to serve developing countries. After the event, the DC-10 was set to take its final flight to the Pima Air & Space Museum in Tucson for retirement and public display.

The Condor Squadron performs a flyover before landing at the Festival.
Away from the airfield, fun for the whole family was plentiful with live music provided by Rock for Vets, a musical rehabilitation program for at-risk youth and veterans, and food and drink provided by vendors such as The Hungry Nomad, Belly Bombz, Roxanne’s Cocktail Lounge, and Legends Sports Bar. Children were treated to jumpers, assisted rock climbing, and face painting. Airport and City vehicles comprised an interactive Touch-A-Truck display and a car show was put on by Honoring our Fallen, an organization that supports our nation’s fallen heroes and their families. Vendors present included the Toyota Grand Prix, Eagle Scouts, TSA, a local independent chocolate company, and a bilingual education program.

A glimpse of Honoring our Fallen's car show.
Attendees praised the free event for providing family-friendly fun and a rare inside look at the Airport. This year’s event hosted more than double the amount of guests who visited in 2015. With public interest growing and more aircraft and activities gracing the airfield each year, the Festival of Flight promises to be a Long Beach mainstay for years to come.

Catalina Flying Boats DC-3

Tuesday, November 15, 2016

Long Beach City Presents Results of Feasibility Study for Federal Customs Facility


The City of Long Beach has presented the long-awaited results to the public of a feasibility study on a federal customs facility at Long Beach Airport (LGB). The study was presented at the Airport Advisory Commission (AAC) and Economic Development Commission (EDC) meetings last month. The city commissioned the study to Jacobs Engineering (Jacobs) as a step towards potentially allowing international flights at the airport. JetBlue Airways submitted a request to bring international service to Long Beach, and the City Council authorized moving forward with the study in July, 2015. The Jacobs study as well as meeting transcripts may be found here.

The Jacobs study has provided Long Beach city with vital information to keep the best interest for our local communities. The study also shows the benefits to be derived to justify the Federal Government expense, as required by the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP).

On January 19, 2016, the City of Long Beach commissioned Jacobs to conduct the study. The study was commissioned after a Request for Qualifications was issued and two community meetings were held to gather feedback from the public. Specifically, the analysis surveyed the airport, airport tenants, government agencies, airport-dependent businesses and aircraft owners for economic data, and analyzed passenger traffic-related spending.

A separate analysis conducted by the Long Beach City Attorney’s Office examining possible effects to Long Beach’s Noise Compatibility Ordinance (LBMC 16.43) was also released with the Jacobs study.

The topic will be presented to the City Council at their December 13 meeting.

Thursday, October 27, 2016

Long Beach Airport Recognized by Esteemed Publications in the Same Week

On Wednesday, October 26, Long Beach Airport (LGB) was one of ten airports to land a spot on Condé Nast Traveler magazine’s “10 Best Airports in the U.S.” LGB was chosen by the magazine’s readers for the third consecutive year and climbed three spots to #7.

LGB's meet and greet area between the terminal and concourse
“We are very honored to have been named to this venerated list,” said Airport Director Jess L. Romo, A.A.E. “This recognition is a reflection of how satisfied our customers continue to be when traveling through Long Beach Airport.”

Inside LGB's concourse
Voters praised the open-air concourse with California vibes and the historic terminal, which reminds travelers of the glamorous Golden Age of Flying. Over 300,000 readers voted in this year’s poll and LGB earned an overall score of 77.92.

LGB's historic terminal
Soon after the Airport’s recognition, Long Beach was named SoCal’s Coolest Beach Town in the November 2016 issue of Sunset Magazine. LGB is proud to be part of a community recognized as SoCal’s hippest creative hub.

To see the full Condé Nast Traveler list which includes Long Beach destinations such as Austin-Bergstrom International Airport (AUS) and Portland International Airport (PDX), click here. To read more, pick up the November 2016 issue of Sunset Magazine, available on newsstands everywhere.

Monday, October 3, 2016

Recently, Airports Council International – North America (ACI-NA) announced the newly elected officers and members of their Public Safety and Security (PS&S) Committee. Among those named to the committee’s steering group was Long Beach Airport’s Manager of Security, Drew Schneider.

The PS&S Committee’s mission is to enhance the safety and security of airports by providing recommendations to industry and government for aviation safety and security policies. Their members identify and promote best practices in aviation safety and security, and develop educational and technological resources that help accomplish safety and security objectives at airports. The PS&S Committee also provides leadership and continually evaluates opportunities to improve the knowledge of aviation security professionals.

LGB congratulates Drew Schneider on his appointment to this prestigious committee!

Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Long Beach Airport Visited by Boeing’s Quietest, Cleanest Aircraft

On Thursday, September 22, Long Beach Airport (LGB) became the first airport to be visited by Boeing’s 737 MAX 8 during Southwest Airlines and Boeing's service ready operational validation (SROV) exercise. Southwest Airlines is the launch customer of the aircraft, which will begin flying in Southwest's fleet late next year. SROV was a five-day exercise where a test aircraft operated some of Southwest's routes and tested various real and simulated operational scenarios including ensuring it meets airports’ standards.

All photos courtesy of Ron Reeves of Long Beach Airport (LGB).
This aircraft uses Leading Edge Aviation Propulsion (LEAP) engines, which are among the most efficient, quiet, and clean engines available. The B737 Max is likely to be one of the last “tube and wing” designs because the need for greater efficiency, less noise, and lower emissions is driving the move to a blended wing design for commercial aircraft.


An important factor in integrating a new aircraft into a commercial fleet is ensuring that it can meet noise regulations, as people are living closer to airports than ever before. The 737 MAX was designed to be 40 percent quieter than Boeing’s Next-Generation 737. After conducting preliminary tests, Keith Leverkuhn, vice president and general manager of the 737 MAX program, remarked that “the MAX noise levels are right where we want them to be.”